About your Search

20121121
20121129
STATION
CSPAN 11
MSNBCW 5
CSPAN2 3
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 2
CNNW 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
to show you a tape from dan senor on "morning joe" he's a foreign policy adviser to mitt romney. he took on mitt romney critics piling on the former nominee. let's listen to dan senor. >> tens of thousands of people, you could hear the top ten romney surrogates at the event. i'm backstage with some of them, i won't mention their names but talking about romney like he's reagan. you know, the debate performances were the best debate performance of any republican nominee in presidential history. this guy's iconic. they were talking about him, because they believed he was going to win in four, five days. in fact, some of them were talking about transition to position themselves for romney cabinet. >> first to jump -- >> i won't say who they are. they know who they are. they were on television, the body was -- unbelievable. five, six days later. absolutely eviscerating him. >> there you go, it's calling being two-faced. it has to do -- people at headquarters, they show up at election night, unless the guy or woman loses and they get excited about the guy near election night because they want
of the republican party,. with matt, later we will talk with dan glickman on whether congress can reach compromise during the lame-duck session. -- we will speak about the future of the republican party with matt lesis. we will be right back. [video clip] >> you listen to mayor bloomberg, said the damage was an president and maybe the worst storm the city ever faced and the tidal surge was 14. governor chris christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable and we had fires and hurricane force winds, massive flooding, deepersnow. when you looked at that and but flooding to the health care systems and the shutdown of the stock exchanges, you start to get a sense of the massive scale and scope of this storm and yet the networks performed. i have read dozens of stories over the last couple weeks on how for many consumers their only tie to any information or people was through their smartphone, linking social media and other smartphone. while there was an impact on some websites, the networks performed really pretty well. >> my assessment is some networks did well, some networks did less well, bu
the other day. >> i'll tell you would -- go ahead, erin. >> i was going to say let's go back to dan's first comment. dan is a smart guy but that was naive of him to say. look, no one liked mitt romney to begin with. people don't like mitt romney now. he had a good first debate and so people thought, oh, maybe he actually has a chance. but the republican party never liked mitt romney 37 they never felt in love with him. he happened to be the establishment guy who was going to get the job. you look to the 2016 field of republican candidates and a lot of the electorate loves those people. like marco rubio. the electorate loves him. i'm sorry, i think dan was very off on those comments. >> chris, there's something deeper here we haven't talked about -- >> let's start with something simple. let's assume the republican party wants to rebuild and to be a four quarter offense, they want to compete in the northeast, southeast, midwest and the west. let's assume that. are you saying rubio is a better candidate to compete, a good candidate to compete in the northeast? where would he win in the northea
different story. dan kerman. >> what a difference a day makes on this day before thanksgiving s f o have mostly sunny skies. that translated into most flights running on time. >> everything has been dismissed so far. >> everything has been great if it ever is been -- smoot so far. we are on our way home. >> these weather conditions were great. >> we got here early, panicked, the whole bit! [laughter] >> however, it is fine. >> these people were connecting and even they were finding the bright side. >> we are going to go to atlanta but the las vegas connection is it delayed. >> we are on time out of san francisco. >> this relatively cease and travel allowed people to focus. >> i am looking for to spend thanksgiving with my family, my sister-in-law, has spent. turkey and not having to cook myself. and my- husbands. >> our family has fried turkey every thanksgiving you. if a what is that like? if >> is just like a dream. >> 120 dozen people pushing through s f o. it seems to be the busiest wet 120,000 people friday, however was the busiest-day. and as sunday is expected to be with 80,000 pe
houdini." and the ever-reliable dan balz, who is back with more tealz of army special agent john fuller for his 25th novel "the forgotten." gillian, i want to start with you. just a masterpiece of writing, your book. i don't want to give away too much of it. so i'll let you tell us. but it is the story-- it is a thriller but it's told in a very unusual way, and basically, it's about trust in a marge that sort of went wrong. >> it's about nick and amy dunn. they're a married couple, and amy goes missing on her five-year anniversary, and it starts with that very basic premise, but the story is told as kind of a he said/she said sort of story. so it's told from nick's point of view, on the day she goes missing and as he quickly starts to become a person of interest, we don't know where amy is and what happened to her. and through amy, through diary entries from the first days of their courtship to the days she's missing, and we come to quickly understand these two not entirely reliable narrator, and you're going to have to sift through and decide who to believe. >> schieffer: that was the
america, if you're picking somebody up? virgin ? all looking good. >> thank-you, dan let wil we wil check in with you again later, and also expect some company on the roots. in the roads one of the benicia bridge drivers and expected to be higher than the usual trickle says that five the new drivers will travel more than 50 mi.. that would be up a fraction of a percent from last year. 45 percent of those travelers are hitting the road today. >> with all of the extra cars on the road of grant lotus is tracking trafficker run the bay area. you will have that in a minute but first, kron 4 is tracking your holiday weather. let us look at this on the top right is from mt. tam. of the bottom is a san francisco skyline. a very rainy weekend. jacqueline, is this wet weather still going to be gone? >> is, the good news is that we are still seeing some clear skies. if your headed out the door or for this evening or tomorrow you were not " revenue proble problems t with clear skies another- look at the golden gate bridge where we are also seeing clear skies with the was not the casa lot of rainfall,
to the u.n. dan gillerman will be with us moments away. he will give us his perspective coming up. bill: a surprise announcement from israel. president ehud barak says he is quit politics but will stay on after the january elections in israel. often seen as a moderating force and in considering possible military action. he is 70 years old. he says he wants to spend more time with his family. that news out of israel. martha: it is a very busy morning here in "america's newsroom.". ahead evidence iran has used the recent israel-gaza crisis as a bit of distraction from the rest of the world. we have details on secret operations ahead in a fox news exclusive. bill: was this a white house cover up after the days after the attacks in benghazi and the days before? there are new allegations from leading republicans on that. kt mcfarland will break it down. >> it is assumed the proportions of any other major scandal in this town. there are many layers to the onions. there are all kinds of questions that have been raises i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i
to try to make sure things are done his way. our white house correspondent dan lothian is joining us now with new information. what are you learning, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, while senior members of the administration including secretary geithner, chief of staff jack lou also top advisor meeting with -- the president himself trying to sell his vision to the public, but some say it's not a winning strategy. it doesn't take a gps to find the way to the fiscal cliff. much more difficult, finding the off ramp. at the president's first meeting with congressional leaders more than a week ago, there was a sense of optimism. >> my hope is is that this is going to be the beginning of a fruitful process. >> reporter: there was a follow-up phone call with house speaker john boehner, but a much different approach this week. the president's calendar is packed with sales pitches to the public, which he hopes will strengthen his hand in negotiations with republicans. on monday a white house report on the impact of middle class tax cuts on the economy. tuesday, a meeting with small business owners.
their re-election battles take over. representatives carol shay porter and dan maffei take the top. if you have a trivia question for us, e-mail us. until i had the shingles. i have never encountered such a burning sensation... it was like a red rash. like somebody had set a bag of hot charcoal on my neck. i had no idea it came from chickenpox. it's something you never want to encounter. for more of the inside story, visit shinglesinfo.com is the same frequent heartburn treatment as prilosec otc. now with a fancy coating that gives you a burst of wildberry flavor. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? because this is america. and we don't just make things you want, we make things you didn't even know you wanted. like a spoon fork. spray cheese. and jeans made out of sweatpants. so grab yourself some new prilosec otc wildberry. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. >>> let's bring back our panel. bob costantini, fred marcus, ruth, and fred yang. talking about congressional ego stroking was one of the tenets that mad
get what you need. i have to remind myself of this constantly. don't we all. >> dan says one of the best rock songs written in man kind's history. gimme shelter, a haunting guitar intro that ushers in a summary of a generation's fears. still rings true to this day. i love it. >> well written, dan. >> kathy chimed in. said got to be satisfaction. that song lives on forever! hard to argue with that. >> this from thomas. i want to see rob do his impression. >> i don't remember doing a mick jagger impression on the show. i don't remember. the viewers, i swear i don't remember. i think i did it in private. >> you have done so many crazy things. >> exactly. i don't remember the mick jagger impersonation. >> whatever. you did it -- listen. >> an impersonation. >> he did this yesterday. i know h can do it. come on. rise up. be a man. >> i haven't had any. >> get some motivation. >>> listen to this. this may take the buzz out of it. the average age for the four living members, two years older than the nine justices on the supreme court. >> that is amazing. i didn't think anyone was ol
talked about this. as has dan hartman. a hacking group associated with anonymous claims to have penetrated karl rove's network and plant and tested a targeted password protected fire wall called the great oz which they hoped would protect the great citizens. they tried unsuccessfully in so 5 times to -- in 105 times to change tallies on election night. which explains his refusal to accept the results. if karl rove doesn't resign, the evidence goes to a certain painfully bored nemesis hanging out in an embassy in london. [ ♪ dramatic ♪ ] >> but more importantly, they're going to give the evidence to the fbi. >> stephanie: the frog marching of karl rove might happen. >> in 2004, at 11:13, all of the servers crashed and it bounced to another server in tennessee. the votes came back suddenly. kerry was leading in a landslide. >> stephanie: i'm not a constitutional scholar which i know shocks both of you. can john kerry be retroactively named president after president obama? >> no. >> stephanie: why not? >>
nonfatal shootings few dan and saturday afternoon. now they say a gas explosion in the city of springfield damaged 42 buildings. it leveled a strip club and heavily damaged a day care center. they are not sure what caused the explosion that scattered debris over several blocks. it is part of the entertainment district after a gas odor filled the area. >> any ignition source can set the detonation. it could be a spark. a telephone ringing. a door bell. >>> the expression injured 18 people. most of them being emergency ponders or utility workers. three buildings have been red tagged. they need further inspections to determine if they are structurally sound. >> that is not the only massive explosion. a historical fire caught fire outside of boston. 100 firefighters were called in to battle the flames. two of the firefighters were injured when part of the building collapsed. several dozen residents are displaced and put up in a nearby hotel. the cause that fire sub investigation. >>> 12 people have died in a fire at a bangladesh garment factory. some of the victims died trying to escape the fl
to dan gillerman, well known ambassador in israel. he said the only way it will end is stamp out hamas. can that really be done? >> first of all i agree with the ambassador. i think he is spot on. with the ideology they have that calls for the destruction of israel the only way you are going to defeat them is actually get them on the ground. now that is going to be very challenging because a lot of them have a backdoor to go into egypt. with president morsi being a muslim brotherhood, he is supporting them, although he played a key role in this truce. the fact is to stop this from happening they are going to have to destroy hamas. >> gregg: hamas will rearm with iranian made rockets and other weapons that are smuggled in through gaza through sudan and egypt. egypt says, of course, and did just several days -- we'll that i can sure they don't rearm. you don't believe that, do you? >> not at all. egypt has been letting them come through the corridor and their part of the problem. when we had mubarek there, he was pretty good about cutting the flow of weapons. that is one of new challenge
of everyday and i have a fixed format. maybe they are on an iphone or dan android pc. you want to give each person the best possible handful of pieces of content for them at that time. that is a growing problem. it is during free quickly and we believe it is important to solve. there is a bunch of machine learning, a bunch of infrastructure to assemble for each person. one thing i think about this is your publishing for each of $1 billion ever met. there is a model that tries to project is most likely to get air active with optimizing -- news feed optimizes what they would like to interact with. what will create a consumer of between the publisher and consumer? that is the high level. >> you think about how that system works for. lettis positive feedback. you'll get more of that thing. how do you tweak the algorithms so people ill don't show up -- it is a personalized newspaper. how do you now the difference between how they interact. people want to have both interactive, one more often but they want to see the other one and check it out occasionally. >> the main thing we rely on there is p
of what moral envision as dan pointed out in his chapter in the book he had edited commemorating the passage of the morel act that we're celebrating the 150th anniversary this year, and say his vision was for liberal education as well as toll tal yaren and as the american research university e americaed from the classical -- and the science and technology certainly science and technology draws more federal support, but without the humanities and -- there is just absolutely extraordinary work being done in the humanities which informs our intellectual culture, it's pervasive, i think it's just not as -- it doesn't produce the breakthrough technology as you said that the nano technology cousin. >> do the panelists think that the humanities are getting the short end of the stick. are they just jealous of the new buildings for the engineering college? >> i think that there's no question they feel downtrodden. in reality, if you look at the fundamental purpose of the university education, although we have the vocational focus right now sometimes said that the purpose of the college ed
for the pardon of richard nixon. but he was given a current award before his dad dan tow. it was an unbelievable -- courage award before his death. it was an unbelievable honor for him. [applause] at the time, woodward and bernstein criticized, but he knew in the long run it was the right thing to do and for our nation to heal, it had to happen. if we were going to take a president and go through the whole ross s, -- of the whole process, our country would not be where it is today. that is one of them. the things my mother did as far as bringing press counselor out of the closet and doing so much for women -- [applause] and women oppose the health issues. it was also later after they left the white house in what she did for drug and alcohol addiction. [applause] those are the things that stand out in my mind. the bicentennial, lynda mentioned 1976. the you're the bicentennial was an unbelievable experience. -- the year of the bicentennial was and am a believable experience -- an unbelievable experience. the tall ships were amazing. it made you proud to be an american. >> we are going to take som
the future of the republican party and dan about the potential for a better part is an agreement on the fiscal cliff. we will also look at the federal housing administration and $16 billion shortfall. that is all at 7:00 eastern tomorrow morning. we will see you then. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> next on c-span, "newsmakers" with mary kay henry
of cornell and the current trustee of the state university of new york. dan convened our symposium and is a past president of the university of vermont. jim is the president emeritus of the university of michigan who put the michigan people together. pete is the head of the association of public and land grant universities and also the past president of michigan state. i think governance is a big issue now. over the last year, we have seen a lot of public university presidents founder in some way. it makes you wonder if it is a doable job. shortly after the fiasco at the university of virginia, i was talking to a lot of past and present public research university people probably the most passionately frustrated of them is, who is now at a private university in florida but is the past president at the university of wisconsin. she said, it was so much easier to run the department of health and human services, which is huge, and the university of wisconsin because i have some power. i could do something. as a public university had, we do not have any power. we are just tugboat talk to
, but it is actually the demand side that is broken, not the supply side. dan mintz any move the government makes to take money out of the pockets -- that means that any move the government makes to take money out of the pockets of the middle income people will hurt the economy. one third of the economy and economic problems are caused by lack of unemployment. so, if more money were spent on a jobs program, especially building roads, things that increase productivity, we would be much better off than giving tax breaks to the rich. so, i think the argument is skewed because we have a supply- demand economy, and it is the demand but is broken here. host: zachary goldfarb. guest: the most immediate problem is a continued lack of demand and economic activity which is leftover from the financial crisis and the recession, and there is a debate in washington over whether you should address that now through additional spending measures. there are not many proposals to do that, but people like larry summers have suggested reviewing the payroll tax cut. in the context in the debate over the bush tax cuts,
itself and jim brown, the nfl legendary, the legendary nfl running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so what i would like to do now is start off this conversation about the under 14 question, the pre-high school equation and i would like to do that with our special guest, dr. robert cantu who many of you will of course are familiar with. he is the chief of neurosurgery and ch
in the air. people were still uncomfortable about walter having stepped down and dan rather stepping in. i think there was competition and jealousy, and the. i think on walter's part there was some regret. he he was such an icon even in his own day. what made me excited was that, through all of that, the cuure of storytelling and reporting did not change at all. in some ways, it gradually did start to change at cbs. but, for me, i could not believe it. i felt like these people were so professional. i was scared to death. that is a good thing, i think, that you feel like you have a lot of experience and you have done a lot of reporting and producing and you understand television news, but you are surrounded people who are really good and challenge you. i love that. i felt like i was able to learn some of the more traditional values you will at thechool that started in our building. i will talk about those a little bit as we go. hi also got very fortunate because i ended up overseas within about three years. .ased in london i recommend it highly for students. think about an international ass
. maybe they are on an iphone or dan android pc. you want to give each person the best possible handful of pieces of content for them at that time. that is a growing problem. it is during free quickly and we believe it is important to solve. there is a bunch of machine learning, a bunch of infrastructure to assemble for each person. one thing i think about this is your publishing for each of $1 billion ever met. in needs to stab today. there is a model that tries to project is most likely to get air active with optimizing -- news feed optimizes what they would like to interact with. what will create a consumer of between the publisher and consumer? that is the high level. >> you think about how that system works for. lettis positive feedback. you'll get more of that thing. how do you tweak the algorithms so people ill don't show up -- it is a personalized newspaper. how do you now the difference between how they interact. people want to have both interactive, one more often but they want to see the other one and check it out occasionally. >> the main thing we rely on there is people. on
running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so what i would like to do now is start off this conversation about the under 14 question, the pre-high school equation and i would like to do that with our special guest, dr. robert cantu who many of you will of course are familiar with. he is the chief of neurosurgery and chairman of the department of surgery and drifter of services of
legal in the country. this is about 50 minutes. >> dan has written a wonderful book but it you have not seen the exhibit downstairs, i think he will be impressed with what has been put together in celebration of the prohibition and anti prohibition movement. it is exciting to talk about prohibition for the reason that the election has put the question of anti prohibition before us all over again. in addition to the ballot initiative in colorado and washington, we have medical use approved in massachusetts and two new announcements in rhode island and maine that legislations will take up the question of decriminilization of marijuana for recreational use. the question of the day is one i will offer today which is what lessons can we draw from prohibition for today's issue? >> the first one we know that prohibition was a terrible failure. despite the best of intentions, there were good reasons for prohibition. the efforts did not succeed. the comparison i make is to prostitution. every society since the dawn has tried to outlaw prostitution and no one has succeeded. it is part of a wo
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)